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Insulin Production of UNDBIO Supported by Sen. Manchin and WV Officials

(NewsUSA) - In a landmark Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed on May 17, 2022, by Mitch Carmichael, the Secretary of State for Economic Development of West Virginia, and Yong Soo Jun, Chairman of UNDBIO, Inc. the State of West Virginia agreed to provide fiscal, tax, and other incentives to promote UNDBIO’s production of insulin in West Virginia.  Secretary Carmichael also pledged to work with state, county, and local officials to promote UNDBIO’s insulin production.     

The purpose of the MOU is to meet the need for reasonably priced insulin in the United States and North America, as currently over 50 million persons are suffering from diabetes in the United States. In West Virginia alone 16 percent of the adult population suffers from diabetes.  The most commonly used forms of analogue insulin cost 10 times more in the United States than in any other developed country.     

UNDBIO estimates that its manufacture of insulin will create 1,200 new jobs in West Virginia and result in the transfer of its innovative technology platforms including human insulin, insulin analogues, and delivery innovation such as insulin sustained release injection.     

UNDBIO will commence its research and construction of its West Virginia manufacturing plant in the second half of 2022, complete its pilot facility in 2023, and manufacture clinical drugs for human clinical trials in 2024.     

“I am happy to establish our relationship with the State of West Virginia to manufacture affordable insulin and insulin analogues for the diabetic population around the globe,” said UNDBIO’s Chairman Jun. “We would welcome other partners and investors into our global insulin project,” he said.     

UNDBIO officials recently met with U.S. Senator Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), who said, “UNDBIO has showcased their commitment to bringing long-term, good-paying jobs to West Virginia and as UNDBIO, WVU and state officials continue discussions, my staff and I are prepared to support these efforts to bring manufacturing opportunities to the Mountain State.”     

Support is echoed by U.S. Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.), who said “The news of this agreement between UNDBIO and the State of West Virginia is a positive step forward in UNDBIO’s quest to manufacture insulin right here in West Virginia. While there is still more work to do to finalize this new facility, I stand ready to help to make sure this becomes a reality. I congratulate UNDBIO on this advancement and look forward to supporting them in their investment that could lead to creating more than 1,000 jobs in West Virginia.”     

UNDBIO has signed a Memorandum of Understanding indicating its intention to manufacture insulin at the Research Park owned by West Virginia University (WVU) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The support of federal and state officials of West Virginia was echoed by Gordon Gee, President of West Virginia University, who said, “We look forward to building a strong relationship with UNDBIO that can further an important part of our land-grant mission to provide opportunities for better access to health care.”     

For further information, contact: Dr. Haiching Zhao/UNDBIO, [email protected]; Tel: 240-234-4717.

Reissue: June 15, 2022

Beware of Self-Treatments & Bizarre Vagina Trends

(NewsUSA) - The pandemic created a major shift in the way people consume - and, more importantly, trust - information, especially as it relates to vaginal health. In fact, a new survey conducted by OnePoll on behalf of RepHresh of 2,000 American women age 24-34 reveals that two in five women named Google as their go-to source of information over a physician when experiencing discomfort or vaginal health symptoms.

Many women are also turning to social media for health advice. For example, on TikTok, hashtags relating to the words "sex education" have over 70 million views. A now infamous TikTok video, providing a tutorial on how to relieve constipation through "vaginal splinting" has racked up over 3 million views and the latest popular #icecubechallenge claims to tighten the vagina and curb bacterial overgrowth.

While these trending DIY/at-home medical hacks can be entertaining, many of these practices are not only ineffective at controlling the natural balance of good and bad bacteria, but can be dangerous and cause more harm than good. Melting an ice cube in the vagina can elevate the natural pH balance and trigger a bacterial infection as the pH of water (7.5-8) is higher than the normal vaginal pH (3.5-4.5). And, while vaginal splinting is a scientific method used by medical professionals, experts caution trying it at home as it poses a risk of bacterial spread if not done properly.

The RepHresh survey found that over half (51%) thought a vagina should have a neutral pH, and only 12% correctly identified "moderately acidic" as the ideal pH balance. In addition, the top three most Googled phrases and questions respondents needed answers about included "vaginal discharge" (44%), "do I have a yeast infection?" (39%) and "vaginal odor" (37%).

With an uptick in misinformation, most women frequently misdiagnose their vaginal symptoms. That's why it's more critical than ever that women turn to trusted health care professionals for advice, proper diagnosis and remedies for the actual problem.

Here are a few important things women might not know, but need to know to maintain good vaginal health:

1. Vaginal odor is completely normal and should not be a cause for alarm. Refrain from using unnecessary scented products, including wipes and washes that claim to eliminate odor with fruity or flowery fragrances, as this will not solve the root cause of the issue, which is an unbalanced pH. Do look for clinically-backed and doctor-recommended products for vaginal health, such as over-the-counter RepHresh Gel, which rebalances pH to a healthy range, eliminates odor, and lasts up to three days.

2. Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) and yeast infections can present similar symptoms, such as unusual vaginal discharge and discomfort, so when women run to the drug store and buy an OTC yeast medication such as Monistat, they are not addressing the root cause of the problem. Two out of three times it is BV, which must be treated with an antibiotic from their health care provider. But, antibiotics can kill the good and bad bacteria and cause a yeast infection, so make sure to take a vaginal probiotic once a day such as RepHresh Pro-B as it contains 2 strains of vaginal lactobacilli to keep the vaginal flora in balance and eat foods high in probiotics like a healthy no-sugar-added Greek yogurt, kefir, kimchi, or miso.

3. High sugar and alcohol intake can elevate pH imbalances and contribute to an overgrowth of yeast. Maintain a healthy moderation of sugary drinks and junk food as excess amounts not only impact vaginal health, but overall weight gain and wellness.

4. Vaginal discharge is a completely normal function in which the vagina naturally removes old cells to keep the environment healthy and clean. Some women have more discharge, while others might experience very little, and it can change in color and thickness depending on the ovulation cycle. However, discharge accompanied with itching, burning, fishy odor, swelling, unusual color, or pelvic pain should be brought to a doctor's attention as it can be a bacterial infection or STI and must be treated appropriately.

Before trying something new, consult with your healthcare provider especially when things seem off to ensure the safety and efficacy of the method or product you are considering. And, don't miss your annual OB/GYN visit.

Maria Sophocles, MD, OB/GYN is the Medical Director of Women's Healthcare of Princeton in Princeton, NJ.

Seven Ways to Support Healthy Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

(NewsUSA) - Pregnant or planning a pregnancy? It's time to think about your blood pressure, even if you've never had high blood pressure. About half of pregnancy complications, such as having a preterm baby, are related to high blood pressure. Pregnancy complications also increase your risk of heart disease later in life. But many pregnancy complications can be prevented.

You may begin your pregnancy with a healthy blood pressure of less than 120/80 mm Hg, but still develop a type of high blood pressure that occurs during or right after pregnancy. One complication is gestational hypertension, defined as blood pressure 140/90 mm Hg or greater. It typically occurs after 20 weeks of pregnancy or close to delivery.

Another condition is preeclampsia, a combination of high blood pressure that develops after 20 weeks of pregnancy with other signs your organs aren't working well, such as high protein levels in your urine. Serious cases can lead to life-threatening seizures or coma, a condition known as eclampsia.

Here are seven ways to help keep you and your baby safe from problems related to high blood pressure.

1. Talk to your healthcare provider.

Even if you're not yet pregnant, knowing if you have high blood pressure can help determine if you're at higher risk for pregnancy-related complications. Work with your provider to make a plan for a healthy pregnancy. This includes discussing:

  • What a healthy blood pressure range is for you.
  • How to control or lower high blood pressure by adopting a healthy lifestyle, such as being physically active, choosing heart-healthy foods that are low in salt and sodium, and not smoking.
  • Medications you are taking. If you're already on blood pressure medicine, ask if the type you take is okay to use when pregnant.
  • Your family's health history. If others in your family had preeclampsia, your provider may recommend taking extra precautions.
  • How other individual factors, such as your age, where you live, your race, or access to healthcare may affect your risk for pregnancy-related complications.

2. Monitor your blood pressure.

Usually, you can't feel if you have high blood pressure. As part of your regular prenatal care, your provider will check your blood pressure at each visit. If it's high, they may suggest you get a home monitor. If you need one, ask someone at your provider's office to help make sure it's working properly and that you're using it correctly. Then keep track of your numbers. Also, ask your healthcare provider when you should call if your numbers go up.

3. Know the signs of preeclampsia.

Preeclampsia may not cause symptoms at first. However, you may notice some mild symptoms, such as:

  • Swelling in your hands or face
  • Gaining weight suddenly over one to two days
  • Gaining more than two pounds a week
  • Peeing less often than normal

Preeclampsia generally occurs after the 20th week of pregnancy. It can also develop after delivery, most often within 48 hours. If you have any symptoms or something doesn't feel right, it's always best to call your provider. Go to the emergency department or call 9-1-1 if you experience any of these symptoms of severe preeclampsia:

  • Headache that doesn't go away or becomes worse
  • Trouble breathing
  • Pain on the right side, below the ribs, or in the right shoulder
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Vision changes

4. Get support from friends and family.

Share signs of pregnancy complications with your family and friends. Ask them to help you monitor how you're feeling and help you get medical care. When you're talking to a health provider, these friends can make sure you describe all of your symptoms and ask all of your questions, and they can advocate for you so you get the care you need.

5. Try to manage stress.

Stress isn't good for your blood pressure. Practice turning on your body's built-in relaxation response (the opposite of the stress response). Guided imagery, progressive muscle relaxation, and deep breathing exercises are techniques that can help you relax. Moving more can help calm your mind and body, and is important for your overall heart health. Try yoga or meet up with friends for a brisk walk. Being in nature can also be very soothing for some people.

6. Stay healthy post-pregnancy.

After your pregnancy, try to keep up your self-care routines, especially for your heart health. If you had preeclampsia, you'll need to take extra care of your heart. One of the best things you can do is share the details about pregnancy complications with your healthcare providers. Tell them what happened and what treatment you received. You may need a cardiovascular screening three months after pregnancy and then annually. The screening will measure your blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, and weight. Remember -- you know your body. Identifying and modifying cardiovascular disease risks early can significantly reduce the risk for experiencing a heart attack or stroke later in life. Tell your healthcare provider if your blood pressure goes up or something doesn't feel right.

7. Learn more.

Learn more about heart health and pregnancy and find resources for tracking your blood pressure numbers at nhlbi.nih.gov/hypertension.

 

Siete maneras de mantener una presión arterial saludable durante el embarazo

(NewsUSA) - ¿Está embarazada o planeando un embarazo? Es hora de pensar en su presión arterial, incluso si nunca ha tenido presión arterial alta. Aproximadamente la mitad de las complicaciones en el embarazo, como tener un bebé prematuro, están relacionadas con la presión arterial alta. Las complicaciones en el embarazo también aumentan el riesgo de desarrollar una enfermedad cardíaca años más tarde. Pero muchas complicaciones en el embarazo se pueden prevenir.

Usted puede comenzar su embarazo con una presión arterial saludable de menos de 120/80 mm Hg, pero aun así desarrollar un tipo de presión arterial alta que ocurre durante o justo después del embarazo. Una es la hipertensión gestacional, definida como presión arterial de 140/90 mm Hg o mayor. Por lo general, ocurre después de 20 semanas de embarazo o cerca del parto.

La preeclampsia es una combinación de presión arterial alta que se desarrolla después de 20 semanas de embarazo con otros signos de que sus órganos no están funcionando bien, como niveles altos de proteínas en la orina. Los casos graves pueden conducir a convulsiones o coma potencialmente mortales, una afección conocida como eclampsia.

Aquí se presentan siete maneras de ayudar a mantenerlos a usted y a su bebé a salvo de los problemas relacionados con la presión arterial alta. 

1. Hable con su profesional médico.

Incluso si aún no está embarazada, saber si tiene presión arterial alta puede ayudar a determinar si corre un mayor riesgo de desarrollar complicaciones relacionadas con el embarazo. Trabaje con su profesional médico a fin de hacer un plan para un embarazo saludable. Esto incluye hablar acerca de lo siguiente:

  • Cuál es su rango de presión arterial saludable.
  • Cómo controlar o reducir la presión arterial alta adoptando un estilo de vida saludable, como ser físicamente activa, elegir alimentos saludables para el corazón que sean bajos en sal y sodio y no fumar.
  • Medicamentos que está tomando. Si ya está tomando medicamentos para la presión arterial, pregunte si el tipo que toma puede usarse cuando esté embarazada.
  • El historial médico de su familia. Si otras personas en su familia tuvieron preeclampsia, su profesional médico podría recomendarle tomar precauciones adicionales.
  • Cómo otros factores individuales, como su edad, el lugar donde vive, su raza o el acceso a la atención médica, podrían afectar su riesgo de desarrollar complicaciones relacionadas con el embarazo.

2. Monitoree su presión arterial.

Por lo general, usted no puede sentir si tiene la presión arterial alta. Como parte de su atención prenatal regular, su profesional médico controlará su presión arterial en cada visita. Si es alta, puede sugerirle que consiga un monitor casero. Si necesita uno, pida a alguien en el consultorio de su profesional médico que la ayude a asegurarse de que funcione correctamente y de que lo está usando correctamente. Luego, haga un seguimiento de sus números. Además, pregunte a su profesional médico cuándo debería llamar si sus números aumentan.

3. Conozca los signos de la preeclampsia.

La preeclampsia podría no causar síntomas al principio. Sin embargo, usted puede notar algunos síntomas leves, tales como:

  • Hinchazón en las manos o la cara
  • Aumentar de peso repentinamente durante uno a dos días
  • Subir más de dos libras por semana
  • Orinar con menos frecuencia de lo normal

La preeclampsia generalmente ocurre después de la 20.a semana de embarazo. También puede desarrollarse después del parto, con mayor frecuencia dentro de las 48 horas. Si tiene algún síntoma o le parece que algo anda mal, siempre es mejor llamar a su profesional médico. Vaya al departamento de emergencias o llame al 9-1-1 si experimenta alguno de estos síntomas de preeclampsia grave:

  • Dolor de cabeza que no desaparece o empeora
  • Dificultad para respirar
  • Dolor en el lado derecho, debajo de las costillas o en el hombro derecho
  • Náuseas y vómitos
  • Cambios en la visión

4. Obtenga apoyo de amigos y familiares.

Informe acerca de los signos de complicaciones en el embarazo a sus familiares y amigos. Pídales que la ayuden a monitorear cómo se siente y la ayuden a obtener atención médica. Cuando hable con su profesional médico, estos amigos pueden asegurarse de que usted describa todos sus síntomas y haga todas sus preguntas, y pueden abogar por usted para que obtenga la atención que necesita. 

5. Trate de controlar el estrés.

El estrés no es bueno para su presión arterial. Practique el activar la respuesta de relajación innata de su cuerpo (lo opuesto a la respuesta al estrés). La visualización guiada, la relajación muscular progresiva y los ejercicios de respiración profunda son técnicas que pueden ayudarla a relajarse. Moverse más puede ayudar a calmar su mente y cuerpo, y es importante para la salud general de su corazón. Pruebe a hacer yoga o reúnase con amigos para dar un paseo rápido. Estar en la naturaleza también puede ser muy relajante para algunas personas.

6. Manténgase saludable después del embarazo.

Después de su embarazo, trate de mantener sus rutinas de cuidado personal, especialmente para la salud de su corazón. Si usted tuvo preeclampsia, necesitará tener especial cuidado con su corazón. Una de las mejores cosas que puede hacer es compartir los detalles acerca de las complicaciones en el embarazo con sus profesionales médicos. Dígales qué sucedió y qué tratamiento recibió. Es posible que necesite un examen cardiovascular tres meses después del embarazo y luego anualmente. El examen medirá su presión arterial, el colesterol, el nivel de azúcar en la sangre y el peso. Recuerde ... usted conoce su cuerpo. Identificar y modificar de manera temprana los riesgos de enfermedades cardiovasculares puede reducir significativamente el riesgo de experimentar un ataque cardíaco o un accidente cerebrovascular años más tarde. Informe a su profesional médico si su presión arterial aumenta o si le parece que algo anda mal. 

7. Obtenga más información.

Obtenga más información acerca de la salud del corazón y el embarazo y encuentre recursos para controlar sus números de presión arterial en nhlbi.nih.gov/hypertension.

Turning 65: What to Consider When Selecting a Medicare Plan

(NewsUSA) - Approaching age 65 can be an overwhelming time for many newly eligible Medicare beneficiaries. When can you begin to enroll? Which plans should you consider? What do you need to know?

Here's some information that can help.

You have a seven-month window called the Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) to sign up for Medicare benefits, which begins three months prior to the month you'll turn 65. You are first eligible to receive Medicare coverage at the start of your birthday month. If your current benefits end once you turn 65, it's important to begin researching and comparing your Medicare options early to make sure there's no gap in your coverage.

There are several different types of Medicare plans available:

* Medicare Part A (hospital) and Medicare Part B (medical)

o Administered by the federal government, Original Medicare includes Parts A and B that provide hospital and medical coverage. For most people, Part A is free, so it's important to evaluate your options as soon as you become eligible for Medicare.

* Medicare Part C (Medicare Advantage)

o Offered by Medicare-approved private insurance companies and can be considered an "all in one" alternative to Original Medicare. These plans include all the coverage provided by Medicare Part A and B, and some may include additional benefits like prescription drug coverage, routine dental, vision and hearing care, and innovative offerings such fitness programs, healthy food debit cards for those who qualify and transportation benefits to help you get to doctor's appointments.

* Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug Plans)

o Original Medicare doesn't cover most prescription drugs, so you'll need to sign-up for a stand-alone prescription drug plan (PDP) if enrolled in Original Medicare. These Part D plans are offered by Medicare-approved private insurers, like Humana.

* Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap)

o Like Medicare Advantage, these plans are offered by private insurance companies and may help pay some of the healthcare costs that Medicare Parts A and B don't, like coinsurance, copayments or deductibles.

When selecting a prescription drug plan, you'll want to make sure the medications you're currently taking are covered and compare their costs across different plans. Some plans also take steps to help save you money, like Humana for example. They suggest generic or lower-cost equivalent drugs to their members when they're available. And when it comes to costs, look beyond the monthly premium and consider the additional out-of-pocket costs. Always evaluate the full cost of the plan, including co-payments or co-insurance, and the deductible as well as which pharmacies are in network.

While the many plan options can seem overwhelming, there are resources available to help you choose Medicare coverage that best suits your needs. The Medicare Plan Finder on Medicare.gov allows you to easily compare the benefits and costs of different plans. Other resources on sites such as Humana.com include helpful information to consider in shopping for plans like Physician and Pharmacy finders to help you see if your providers are in a plan's network. While planning ahead is helpful, rest assured that, as your needs change, you can change your plan during the Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug Plan Annual Enrollment Period, which goes from October 15th to December 7th each year.

Medicare-eligible individuals can visit www.Medicare.gov or call 1-800-MEDICARE (800-633-4227), 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Additionally, you can learn about Humana Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug Plans by going to www.Humana.com/Medicare, www.Humana.com/pdp or calling 1-800-213-5286 (TTY: 711) to speak with a licensed sales agent from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. local time, seven days a week. 

Humana is a Medicare Advantage HMO, PPO, PDP, and PFFS organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in any Humana plan depends on contract renewal.

A One-of-a-Kind Lifeline: A First Responder's Kidney Health Journey

(NewsUSA) - - Like the more than 25 million first responders in the United States, Jeff Cooper, a former deputy in the Broward County Polygraph Unit, took an oath to protect and serve his community. However, like many first responders, Cooper's promise did not necessarily extend to himself -- until a worsening medical condition forced him to focus on his health.

Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) affects more than seven million people worldwide, and in 1975 Cooper became one of those impacted by the disease. His PKD diagnosis, a hereditary condition, took him on a journey that would not only give him access to an innovative new technology, but would also allow him to experience remarkable camaraderie that would eventually stretch beyond the oath to protect and serve.

A Lifeline for Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

PKD is a genetic disorder that causes cysts to develop on the kidneys -- making them enlarge and lose function. This hereditary condition can lead to the final stage of chronic kidney disease, also known as "end-stage renal disease." This condition requires more than 70% of patients to undergo dialysis -- a process of removing waste products and flushing excess fluid from the blood to keep kidneys functioning and patients alive -- or undergo a kidney transplant.

Before receiving dialysis, some patients undergo a procedure that creates an access point to their bloodstream, often referred to as a lifeline for dialysis, Arteriovenous (AV) fistulas are created by connecting a vein and artery in the arm, allowing the patient to begin dialysis.

Growing up with a father who underwent dialysis for many years, Cooper saw the side effects of the common, surgically created fistulas on his father's arms (like large, swollen veins) and hoped for a less invasive option that would allow him to continue his normal, active life.

While working with his doctor, Cooper discovered the Ellipsys® Vascular Access System -- a less invasive option for creating AV fistulas that's done through an out-patient procedure. While potential risks associated with creation and maintenance of arteriovenous fistula exist, the Ellipsys procedure can cut the time between fistula creation to dialysis from six months to two months, potentially translating into accelerated dialysis treatment.

A New Outlook, Another Miracle

Cooper received his Ellipsys- created fistula on December 4, 2020, giving him access to life-saving dialysis. Cooper said he was amazed at how fast he could return to everyday activities after the Ellipsys procedure.

After only a few months of adjusting to his new fistula and starting treatment, Cooper received another life-changing surprise. In early February 2021, Guy Kitchens -- coincidentally, a police officer in a neighboring county --gave his fellow officer the ultimate gift -- Kitchens donated his kidney to Cooper. Thanks to Officer Kitchens, Cooper says he feels like a kid again. His kidney function is improving, his doctors are dialing back his medications, and best of all, he's formed a lifelong friendship with Guy, with whom he talks almost daily.

"I've got a little brother now and another extended family," Cooper says. "I've got a living angel in my life."

Without his Ellipsys created fistula and dialysis treatment leading up to that life-changing day in February, Cooper's story might have been more challenging. Please consult with your doctor to see if this procedure is right for you -- results may vary. If you or someone you know is on a dialysis journey, learn more about the Ellipsys procedure, and associated risks, at: www.medtronic.com/Ellipsys.

 

Self-care on Your Schedule with Mental Wellness App

(NewsUSA) - The challenges of the past two years have raised global stress to unprecedented levels, illuminating the importance of prioritizing mental health.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness, the nation's largest grassroots mental health organization, recognizes May as Mental Health Awareness month -- a time to raise awareness and mobilize efforts to support mental health.

This year, let Mental Health Awareness Month serve as a gentle reminder to prioritize your mental well-being and self-care.

Yet, finding the time to focus on our health can be a struggle during busy or challenging times.

That's exactly why mental wellness app, Breethe, meets you where you're at, ensuring self-care becomes a reality and not just a hopeful wish. Breethe's personalized approach -- which easily integrates self-care into your day instead of just adding another item on the to-do list --delivers customized, relatable stress relief right to your phone,

"Breethe is personalized for you and your needs. When it comes to wellness and self-care, there is no one-size-fits-all approach," says Breethe co-founder Lynne Goldberg. "The more we can meet someone where they're at in their day and life, the more lives we can change for the better."

Can't sleep? Feeling anxious? The app's new "Therapy On-The-Go" feature is designed to figure out why, and gets to know its users through a series of quick and easy questions rooted in behavioral science. Then, based on this interaction, it provides personalized recommendations -- including bite-sized therapy talks, meditations, relaxation practices and hypnotherapy sessions.

Additionally, with the "Customize My Day" tab, Breethe helps users sneak in a few minutes of self-care as they go about their day. Choose from a selection of activities, such as starting the day, doing chores, working out, or falling asleep. By setting the times when you typically do the activities, the app recommends what support would serve you best at that specific time.

Finally, Breethe is all about real help for your life -- it offers relatable tools for (very!) specific everyday situations, such as "My Boss is a Jerk" and "My Family Drives Me Nuts," making the app even more accessible, timely and friendly.

This approach differentiates Breethe from other wellness apps because users need not sift through content libraries in search of the right tools. Instead, Breethe provides a personalized experience that delivers the most appropriate content to users on demand, just the solution for busy lives. As the Breethe team explains, "it's like having a best friend and life coach in your pocket."

Visit breethe.com for more information, and for a two-week free trial.

You can check out Breethe on social media by following along at: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/breetheapp (handle: @breetheapp) and Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/breetheapp (handle: @breetheapp).

 

Be a Hero, Save a Life, Learn Hands-Only CPR

NewsUSA

(NewsUSA) - Witnessing a cardiac arrest can be frightening, but don't be afraid to take action -- two simple steps can save a life.

Each year, more than 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside of a hospital or emergency department, according to the American Heart Association. When someone experiences cardiac arrest, immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can make the difference between life and death. In fact, immediate CPR can double or triple a cardiac arrest victim's chance of survival.

Many people still think that effective CPR involves mouth-to-mouth resuscitation as well as chest compressions, and they may be hesitant to perform it, but that is not the case.

Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as the conventional CPR for cardiac arrests in the home, office, or in public places in the first few minutes until more advanced help arrives.

"By equipping people with Hands-Only CPR training, they learn how easy the technique is and there is a comfort level that will help them overcome concerns that cause hesitation to act in an emergency," say Raina Merchant, Chair, American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care.

Hands-only CPR includes just two simple steps.

- First, call 911.

- Second, push hard and fast in the center of the chest of the individual having a cardiac arrest. How hard to push? At least 2 inches. How fast? That's easy. Use the beat of a familiar song that has 100 to 120 beats per minute. For example, the classic disco hit, "Stayin' Alive" can help you stay on pace, but anything with a similar tempo will do.

To help promote the lifesaving value of Hands-Only CPR, the American Heart Association has partnered with the Anthem Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Anthem, Inc., in a public service campaign, "The Power is in Your Hands," to encourage everyone to learn Hands-Only CPR.

"Approximately 70 percent of cardiac arrests happen at home, and CPR can double or even triple chances of survival if performed immediately," said Shantanu Agrawal, M.D., Chief Health Officer at Anthem, Inc. "Together with the American Heart Association, the Anthem Foundation remains focused on working to increase the number of people who learn Hands-Only CPR. By providing greater access to training we can help increase the number of people who are prepared to respond in case of an emergency and for some, that could mean saving the life of someone they love."

The American Heart Association offers a 90-second livestream instructional video demonstration of Hands-Only CPR, as well as a new CPR first-aid app that anyone can download onto a phone.

Visit heart.org/handsonlycpr for more information.

 

Beware of Self-Treatments & Bizarre Vagina Trends

(NewsUSA) - By Maria Sophocles, MD  For NewsUSA

(NewsUSA) - The pandemic created a major shift in the way people consume - and, more importantly, trust - information, especially as it relates to vaginal health. In fact, a new survey conducted by OnePoll on behalf of RepHresh of 2,000 American women age 24-34 reveals that two in five women named Google as their go-to source of information over a physician when experiencing discomfort or vaginal health symptoms.

Many women are also turning to social media for health advice. For example, on TikTok, hashtags relating to the words "sex education" have over 70 million views. A now infamous TikTok video, providing a tutorial on how to relieve constipation through "vaginal splinting" has racked up over 3 million views and the latest popular #icecubechallenge claims to tighten the vagina and curb bacterial overgrowth.

While these trending DIY/at-home medical hacks can be entertaining, many of these practices are not only ineffective at controlling the natural balance of good and bad bacteria, but can be dangerous and cause more harm than good. Melting an ice cube in the vagina can elevate the natural pH balance and trigger a bacterial infection as the pH of water (7.5-8) is higher than the normal vaginal pH (3.5-4.5). And, while vaginal splinting is a scientific method used by medical professionals, experts caution trying it at home as it poses a risk of bacterial spread if not done properly.

The RepHresh survey found that over half (51%) thought a vagina should have a neutral pH, and only 12% correctly identified "moderately acidic" as the ideal pH balance. In addition, the top three most Googled phrases and questions respondents needed answers about included "vaginal discharge" (44%), "do I have a yeast infection?" (39%) and "vaginal odor" (37%).

With an uptick in misinformation, most women frequently misdiagnose their vaginal symptoms. That's why it's more critical than ever that women turn to trusted health care professionals for advice, proper diagnosis and remedies for the actual problem.

Here are a few important things women might not know, but need to know to maintain good vaginal health:

1. Vaginal odor is completely normal and should not be a cause for alarm. Refrain from using unnecessary scented products, including wipes and washes that claim to eliminate odor with fruity or flowery fragrances, as this will not solve the root cause of the issue, which is an unbalanced pH. Do look for clinically-backed and doctor-recommended products for vaginal health, such as over-the-counter RepHresh Gel, which rebalances pH to a healthy range, eliminates odor, and lasts up to three days.

2. Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) and yeast infections can present similar symptoms, such as unusual vaginal discharge and discomfort, so when women run to the drug store and buy an OTC yeast medication such as Monistat, they are not addressing the root cause of the problem. Two out of three times it is BV, which must be treated with an antibiotic from their health care provider. But, antibiotics can kill the good and bad bacteria and cause a yeast infection, so make sure to take a vaginal probiotic once a day such as RepHresh Pro-B as it contains 2 strains of vaginal lactobacilli to keep the vaginal flora in balance and eat foods high in probiotics like a healthy no-sugar-added Greek yogurt, kefir, kimchi, or miso.

3. High sugar and alcohol intake can elevate pH imbalances and contribute to an overgrowth of yeast. Maintain a healthy moderation of sugary drinks and junk food as excess amounts not only impact vaginal health, but overall weight gain and wellness.

4. Vaginal discharge is a completely normal function in which the vagina naturally removes old cells to keep the environment healthy and clean. Some women have more discharge, while others might experience very little, and it can change in color and thickness depending on the ovulation cycle. However, discharge accompanied with itching, burning, fishy odor, swelling, unusual color, or pelvic pain should be brought to a doctor's attention as it can be a bacterial infection or STI and must be treated appropriately.

Before trying something new, consult with your healthcare provider especially when things seem off to ensure the safety and efficacy of the method or product you are considering. And, don't miss your annual OB/GYN visit.

Maria Sophocles, MD, OB/GYN is the Medical Director of Women's Healthcare of Princeton in Princeton, NJ.

Women’s Hearts Need Attention

NewsUSA

(NewsUSA) - Although COVID-19 continues to grab the health headlines, women in particular should not lose sight of a chronic problem -- heart disease.

Heart disease is the number one killer of women, but many women, whether they are wives, mothers, CEOs, or all of the above, tend to put others' health and well-being ahead of their own, and may ignore symptoms. Symptoms of this disease are often different for women than men, so women may not know what to look for.

According to the Mayo Clinic, women are more likely than men to report heart attack symptoms that are not related to chest pain, including shortness of breath, nausea, sweating, pain in one or both arms, unusual tiredness, and indigestion. These symptoms are easily missed, as most people associate heart attacks with crushing chest pain.

Younger women may be surprised to learn that they are at risk as well.

Women younger than 65 years, need to know the risk factors, too, especially those with a family history of heart disease, according to Dr. Neschochi Okeke, MD, a practicing physician in New York City and an expert in women's health.

"Being aware of their unique heart disease symptoms is the first step towards prevention," says Dr. Okeke. Once women know the risks, they can continue to reduce them by making healthy lifestyle choices, such as maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, limiting alcohol, managing stress, and taking medications as prescribed.

Women also may benefit from supplements designed to support heart health, especially the ingredient citrus bergamot, which has been shown in 17 clinical trials to support heart health. Not all bergamot is the same, so women should be sure they are getting the highest quality bergamot -- citrus bergamot -- in health products.

Grown only in a small valley in Italy, citrus bergamot is different from the bergamot that many people associate with licorice candy or Earl Grey tea. In fact, citrus bergamot can help promote and maintain healthy arteries and healthy cholesterol levels, both of which can reduce a woman's risk of heart disease.

"Complementary support is critical these days as part of any woman's journey to overall health and well-being, especially as people recognize the importance of a strong immune system, " says Dr. James Rouse, a naturopathic family doctor and consultant to BergametNA, a producer of natural supplements featuring citrus bergamot.

The HerHeart supplement product for women from BergametNA contains Citrus Bergamot Superfruit™, a unique high-quality citrus bergamot with a 47% BPF (bergamot polyphenol fraction) concentration (the highest available in North America and exclusive to BergametNA), along with other ingredients, damiana and MACA (also known as Peruvian Gold) that have been shown to help support overall health. HerHeart also supports women's health by promoting balanced hormones, which can help ease a range of menopausal symptoms including hot flashes, night sweats, irregular metabolism, and low energy.

Visit tryherheart.com for more information about the supplement, and visit Bergametna.com or call 1-855-556-2131 for more details about other Citrus Bergamot Superfruit™ products for better health. The BergametNA stock symbol is HYEX.

 

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